Botanicals on Black

Having tried white on black in the portraiture class, I thought I’d see how it might transfer to other subjects. The native flower that caught my eye has large bunches of very, very, white-yellow stamens. These would be very difficult to see against a white ground. But on black…

This first one was done with watercolour using a very small brush:

The problem with this is that even with the small brush, the stamens are too thick, and it is hard to convey the fact that there are very many of them. So these next two, done in coloured pencil, are to my mind more successful:

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Portraiture at the Cairns Art Gallery with Craig Hoy – 1st three sessions

A simple start – an imagined head, in graphite. For those who remember, uncannily like Clement Attlee!

And who said both sides of the face should be equal?

Three-quarter head often more interesting than full frontal:

So – three-quarter head, in masses rather than in line, with use of negative space to bring head forward, and done in water-soluble graphite, water applied.

But if line is preferred rather than mass, sometimes a continuous line drawing can work (and sometimes not):

Does one really need to show the face in full? Perhaps less is more:

Less

Still less

And yet less still

A group effort – five people in turn worked on this drawing of me. Therefore the first person set the scale of the whole and made the decision on line or mass. It’s done in soluble graphite and I did the final wash over.

This next series is aiming (not particularly successfully) at some chiaroscuro and sfumato effects. The ideal was not to put a clean line down but to rely on mass. The first two are in uncompressed charcoal:

Now, on brown paper and using two colours – charcoal and white chalk:

And the even more startling white on black!

But line is so seductive, black on white

Or white on black (with graphite overlay to give a silvery sheen):

Still two more sessions to go in this course.

An attempt to draw on an ipad

This series of from 1 to 20 minute-poses, of Julie at JCU Tuesday night, was done on a 9.7″ iPad using Autodesk Sketchbook and an Apple Pencil. It’s a very different experience to drawing on A3 or half-imperial on an easel. Everything shrinks down. Mind you, I doodle sometimes in an A5 pad – and that is smaller than the iPad screen. But the feel is very, very different.

It took me some time to decide which app was best suited from Autodesk, Procreate and Artrage. The unenhanced Autodesk’s simple brush set seemed most appropriate. The next decision was to use only Autodesk and get its feel without being distracted by any use of the other Apps.

I used the pencil, pen, charcoal and watercolour brushes, the blender and eraser. One huge plus is of course the ability to undo and to erase. I have not yet attempted to use layers.

I soon found out that it suited me best to zoom out to 150 or 200% – that gave room for expansion if needed.

Anyway, first doodles: