The Owl and the Asterisk

Joan Miro had a thing about owls – and asterisks.  SWTafe has a thing about torture. Put them both together and you get “The Dreaded Technical Interpretation Triptych” – the first part of which is to ‘interpret’ the following section of a  Miro print given at a size of 18 x 9 cm (the whole triptych fits onto an A4 sheet):

miro

I began this one at “summer camp” – we were directed not to go back in an attempt to undo or correct if we looked back and found even the most egregious of errors, or we would not be able to finish the whole triptych in the time allotted. I thundered right ahead at full speed – and therein lay my downfall:

mishmiro

I was so absorbed in getting down to the actual weaving that I didn’t realise my drawing was way out and that I had a rather expanded (or squashed) owl till day three of work back home… and yes, not enough time to start again and correct the lay of the blue and yellow lines, [bad words deleted here]. The warp is 9 at about 11 epi. A finer warp (or a larger width and height) would have given a much ‘smoother’ interpretation of the base image. The real question here was how to handle the yellow and blue fine lines. The double strands that I used overemphasise them  from the original – but perhaps that is what such a translation/interpretation must do – or maybe single strands would have been better – and why attempt to stick to the original colour anyway? There is some inconsistency in the way I have handled the lines – some are soumak, some are an attempt at flying shuttle and some are embroidered over the base weave. Not one of my better pieces.

So now on to part 2 and Picasso.

Local Art Society new term has started, and maybe some of these quickies could form the basis of ideas for later print making assignments:

prints maybe

When we get a male model (as we frequently do) there will be an opportunity to objectify maleness too…

P.S. I’ve only just noticed – they all face to the right. Hmm. Maybe I must move my easel to the other side…

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4 responses

  1. Mary, the black and white parts, the actual owl, is not in itself difficult. The problem is that the overlay of lines can make it extraordinarily confusing unless one pays great attention and somehow separates the tasks. Unfortunately I got baffled a bit. Thanks for your comment.

    February 12, 2014 at 9:05 AM

  2. Mary

    I am admiring the fact that you could attempt this design. I saw Glennis’ last year (or the year before?) and was also amazed. It looks really difficult. A good discipline exercise. I would have found it really hard, doing a design that wasn’t mine and that I didn’t really like! Well done.

    February 11, 2014 at 10:14 PM

  3. Thanks Stephenis. Points taken!

    February 10, 2014 at 9:22 PM

  4. Squash syndrome will always have the potential to raise it’s niggly head, so 1.always remain diligent and 2. consider weaving sideways 3. always remain diligent!!! Amusing post

    February 10, 2014 at 7:29 PM

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